Words On Break

I’ve decided to give some words a much deserved break from my communications. This is a real challenge. Sometimes I slip up and mistakenly still use them.

Let me make this clear up front, I fully accept that the meaning of words is constantly evolving. This is natural and helps enrich all languages.

However…

In our electronically connected small world, some words and phrases go viral and quickly become tiresome. They just lose their impact and no longer mean much of anything.

So I’m giving the words in bold below a much needed rest. By the way, it would be awesome if you sent me some great suggestions to add to the list. Dammit—see what I mean!

Awesome
Traditionally:
Causing feelings of fear and wonder: causing feelings of awe
–Awe: An emotion variously combining dread, veneration, and wonder that is inspired by authority or by the sacred or sublime <stood in awe of the king>

So…
2014-0309_SaladDid that Caesar salad you ate for lunch really make you pause with feelings of fear and wonder?

Has word gotten out about this yet? I better high-tail it down to the deli and get one before the line is out the door!

Great
Traditionally:
1: Notably large in size
2: Large in number or measure
3: Remarkable in magnitude, degree, or effectiveness <great bloodshed>

So…
RogetThesaurus“Great” was once a, well, great word. With its limitless applicability, it really is difficult not to use this word at least once every twenty minutes.

How about giving these ones a chance though: brilliant, capital, distinguished, fantastic, fine, glorious, heroic, major, outstanding, primary, regal, remarkable, super, superior, or terrific.

Legend, Legendary
Traditionally:
1: A story from the past that is believed by many people but cannot be proved to be true
2: A popular myth of recent origin

So…
A big Boston area auto dealership constantly advertises on the radio that its car prices are “legendary.”

I have a sneaking suspicion that King Arthur and Santa Claus would not be very pleased with these claims.

Tragedy, Tragic
Traditionally:
1a: A medieval narrative poem or tale typically describing the downfall of a great man
1b: A serious drama typically describing a conflict between the protagonist and a superior force (as destiny) and having a sorrowful or disastrous conclusion that elicits pity or terror

So…
2014-0309_HeadstoneSome of my family members said it was a tragedy when my nephew’s gerbil and my beloved 83-year-old Aunt Ruth died of natural causes.

It is certainly sad when house pets and older folks pass on, but tragic? I think it might have just been the old circle of life taking another lap around the block.

Source
Traditional definitions from: www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary

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